Tuesday, 28th of June 2016

Rainbow Trout confirmed on EAGLE LAKE

Submitted by: evanmcd19

Submitted on: Tuesday the 28th of June 2016 at 2:41am

Submitted in: EAGLE LAKE
Species: Rainbow Trout

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Confirmed Rainbow Trout in EAGLE LAKE

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Photo on Fry Lake

Submitted by: Robshaw07

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 10:05pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 10:05pm

Submitted in: Fry Lake

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Photo on Fry Lake

Submitted by: Robshaw07

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 10:05pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 10:05pm

Submitted in: Fry Lake

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Photo on Fry Lake

Submitted by: Robshaw07

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 10:04pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 10:05pm

Submitted in: Fry Lake

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Post on Omineca Region

Submitted by: tanner123

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 9:40pm

Submitted in: Omineca Region

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The first tagged laker I've ever caught and it bled out. 10lb on Williams wobbler.

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Yellow Perch confirmed on Puslinch Lake

Submitted by: Big_Doug'75

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 8:30pm

Submitted in: Puslinch Lake
Species: Yellow Perch

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Confirmed Yellow Perch in Puslinch Lake

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Northern Pike confirmed on Puslinch Lake

Submitted by: Big_Doug'75

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 8:29pm

Submitted in: Puslinch Lake
Species: Northern Pike

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Confirmed Northern Pike in Puslinch Lake

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Largemouth Bass confirmed on Puslinch Lake

Submitted by: Big_Doug'75

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 8:29pm

Submitted in: Puslinch Lake
Species: Largemouth Bass

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Confirmed Largemouth Bass in Puslinch Lake

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Post on Sturgeon Lake

Submitted by: Buckmaster93

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 7:04pm

Submitted in: STURGEON LAKE

Hey all. As promised I'm going to go into a little on what worked for me today while I fished Sturgeon lake this morning.
I launched my canoe from Sandy bay, which is on the north end of the lake. I worked my way out until I was about 40 feet off the end of the weed beds and dropped anchor. I was fishing roughly 6-7 feet of water, casting up to the edge of the weed beds. The lures I used today consisted of 2 main choices, a no.3 len thompson red and white spoon and a plain white jig. Using the spoon, I would retrieve at a medium pace, and managed to pull 4 nice walleye to the boat within 20 minutes or so. Once the bite slowed, I switched to the white jig. I would let the jig hit bottom and slowly retrive giving it a small tug to liven the action up some. This method brought another 15 fish in under 2 hours to the boat. All the walleye averaged 37-40 cm, with 4 exceeding the size limit of 43cm. I was also able to boat 3 pike. all around 45cm. Early in the morning till around early afternoon the walleye stay around the weed beds before heading into the deeper water. I personally run 10-12 pound monofiliment and top it off with a wire leader. I use the wire leader wherever pike are present because lets face it, most of us have lost expensive lures and probably cussed due to the shark like teeth of pike.
The sandy bay area of sturgeon is a great area to catch plenty walleye and pike. My grand total for today was 17 walleye and 3 pike. Not bad for under 3 hours of fishing from only 2 spots. If you guys have any questions or would like to know more about my rig or techniques feel free to reply to my post and I will answer your questions, Until next time, keep your drags set and hooks in the water.
Tanner Jackson

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Boat Launch on Buntzen Lake

Submitted by: m.mercer@about.me

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 5:57pm

Submitted in: BUNTZEN LAKE

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Kokanee confirmed on PUNTZI LAKE

Submitted by: pgdrifter1968

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 3:21pm

Submitted in: PUNTZI LAKE
Species: Kokanee

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Confirmed Kokanee in PUNTZI LAKE

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Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Submitted by: Writeup

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:35pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:36pm

Submitted in: CRANE LAKE

Photo thumbnail: Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Crane Lake, also known as Moore Lake, is one of several lakes in the Cold Lake area. Sport fish species in the lake are walleye, northern pike, yellow perch and lake whitefish. During the summer, Crane Lake can get busy, making it tricky to catch larger pike and perch. The lake is popular in winter for ice fishing.

Multiple iFish Alberta users recommend casting a line or drilling a hole near Bodina Resort. As user Tkaminski explains, “lots of pike action just off the shore at Bodina Resort. 10 feet of water is where the pike are cruising. Any shallower or deeper and you will get nothing.” The lake water turns from clear to green in lake summer and early fall. Aquatic plant life is limited to only a few areas such as the west basin. This lack of vegetation limits fish spawning and feeding habitat in the lake.

The sport fishery in the lake’s inlet and outlet streams is closed for a period during April and May each year. Other popular spots in the area include Hilda Lake and Tucker Lake, both of which are also known for their ice-fishing opportunities.

LAKE ACCESS
Crane Lake is located about 25 km northwest of Cold Lake. From Cold Lake town centre, follow Hwy. 55 west about 19 km to secondary Hwy. 892.
Turn right onto this road and the lake is roughly 10 km from the turnoff. There are two provincial recreation areas on the south shore of the lake, Moore Lake East and Moore Lake West. Both parks have boat launches and campsites.

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Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Submitted by: Writeup

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:30pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:30pm

Submitted in: Little Raspberry Lake

Photo thumbnail: Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

As part of Meadow Lake Provincial Park’s chain of great fishing lakes, Little Raspberry Lake is worth the visit. It is off the beaten path, making it less prone to the pressure and busy-ness that the other lakes in the park face. Little Rasperry Lake has been stocked with both tiger and brown trout, which make a great target to practise fly-fishing. Brown trout take well to flies, and as the lake is not that deep, Little Raspberry can be a great place for a small pontoon boat. Fishing from shore is productive as well.

Brown trout can challenge anglers, and will dive for cover when they’re hooked. If there’s structure to get caught up in, they’ll find it. They’re also more fussy than rainbows in what they will take. This is when it pays to be versatile and to experiment when something is not working. Rabbit Leeches, Woolly Buggers and Cone Heads can be good flies to try, particularly early in the season when the trout are feeding more actively. Leeches are a common early-season pattern, though they can work well throughout the year to entice fish who are not taking to the more current offerings.

Concentrate your efforts more on the drop-off areas and deeper sections than in the shallows. At dusk and later evening, the trout can sometimes head into the shallows to feed, but generally they will look for underwater structure and deeper sections.

LAKE ACCESS
Meadow Lake Provincial Park is located directly north of North Battleford. Take Highway 4 directly to the park and follow the signs. Meadow Lake Provincial Park offers a wide range of services, from concessions to firewood. Several campsites, beaches, playgrounds and options for recreation make this one of the most popular parks in the province. Campsite reservations are definitely recommended. Visit saskparks.net for more information.

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Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Submitted by: Writeup

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:28pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:29pm

Submitted in: MAMIT LAKE

Photo thumbnail: Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Mamit Lake is a shallow, medium-size lake, located between Merritt and Logan Lake in the Mamit Valley. The lake is part of the Guichon Creek watershed, flowing into the Nicola River, near Merritt, and on into the Thompson River. The lake is a popular trolling lake. Wedding Bands and Flatfish are favourite lures for anglers trolling Mamit Lake. Trout are generally in the one or two pound range but have been reported up to five pounds. Because the lake is relatively shallow, it may be a good choice for early spring or later in the fall. Particularly right after ice-off (the time when ice has just left the lake), trout will feed actively.
If you are heading out to fly fish, bloodworms, leeches and shrimp are good early season choices. Other good all-season choices are trolling leeches, Woolly Buggers and Doc Spratleys.

The lake is good for chironomids early in the year, and is also known for its good Mayfly hatch. The north and south ends of Mamit Lake have good shoal areas. Keep in mind that trout will be more active in the evening, as will their food sources. At these times, bright flourescent colours can sometimes produce good results. Mamit lake has a good burbot fishery. However, the B.C. Freshwater Fishing Regulations specify that it is a catch-and-release fishery only.
The wind can get very high down the valley and that can make the lake dangerous at times. Be sure to watch the weather closely and don’t get caught unprepared.

Don’t forget ice fishing! Chilliwack Dart and Tackle has posted some great ice fishing video on the page for Mamit Lake.

LAKE ACCESS
From Kamloops ,head south along Highway 5 to Meadow Creek Road (exit 336), and continue to the town of Logan Lake. At the end of this road, you will meet Highway 97c. Turn left (south) here on to the Highway, also known as Mamit Lake Road, and follow for about 12 km. The road wraps around the eastern shore of the lake and is easy to spot.

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Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Submitted by: Writeup

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:26pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:27pm

Submitted in: EENA LAKE

Photo thumbnail: Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Eena Lake is an ideal location, both for its beauty and its high catch rates. There are several shoals, making it ideal trout habitat. Families and beginners will find this a great place to start. A couple of deeper areas at the north and south ends are perfect for angling in the heat of the summer when the trout go deep. Brian Smith, author of Fly Fishing BC’s Interior and Seasons of a Fly Fisher, says that the west side of the island is a great place to start at any time. The hatches on Eena Lake are a gold mine for fly fishers. Chironomids, mayflies, damselflies, caddisflies and dragonflies are all available to the trout. In particular, Smith calls the mayfly hatch in May and June, “phenomenal.”

Smith adds that chironomids, shrimp and leeches are all staple patterns here. Early and late in the season, try fishing the shallows and out from the shoreline debris. Pick up a copy of Brian Smith’s books at local bookstores. Angler’s Atlas member Dave Bulmer has recently reported a five pound rainbow that he caught on a Red Bellied Humpty fly. His stellar catch included a whopping 85 trout, all of which were released.

LAKE ACCESS
Eena Lake is located about 35 km north west of Prince George, near Nukko Lake. Follow Highway 97 north for about 15 km to Chief Lake Road, and turn left (west). Continue along Chief Lake Rd. for another 18 km (Note: at the 13 km mark the road forks - keep right at the fork). At Eena Lake Road turn left (west) and continue for 5 km. Make a left turn at Woods Road, and then right onto Quinn Road. Access to the lake is at the end of the road.

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Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Submitted by: Writeup

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:25pm

Updated on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 2:25pm

Submitted in: SHANE LAKE

Photo thumbnail: Map of The Day: June 27, 2016

Prince George anglers can now enjoy two great fishing platforms on Shane Lake, thanks to the collaborative efforts of the Polar Coachman Fly Fishing Club, the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC, the Habitat Conservation Trust Fund, the Ministry of Environment and the City of Prince George.

The second platform was built on the western shore of the lake and is designed to make it easier to access deeper water from shore. This is especially helpful when the weather warms up and the trout go deep.This initiative was spearheaded by the late Bob Graham, who championed the process and made sure all the partners were aligned and moving forward. It is with great sadness that Bob is no longer with us to enjoy this dock. He passed away earlier this year. However, the club and The Angler’s Atlas have requested the City name the section of trail leading to the dock in his honour. We at the Angler’s Atlas feel this is a suitable way to recognize the hard work Bob carried out to make this project a reality.

FISHING THE LAKE
Shane Lake is very productive, with a lot of food for the fish. As a result, the trout grow fast. During the cooler seasons, the fish are found throughout the lake and can be easily caught from the dock at the northeast edge of the lake. In the heat of summer, the fish will generally be found in the deeper water. Anglers can visit the new dock on the western shore or carry in a small boat to access the deeper sections of the lake. Several members of the Angler’s Atlas have shared their reports and stories on the site.

LAKE ACCESS
The lake is located within Forests For the World, a park area managed by the City of Prince George. From downtown, take 15th Avenue towards the university, and turn right on Foothills Blvd. just before the hill. Follow Foothills about a kilometre to Cranbrook Hill Rd. on the left (west) side of the road.
Follow Cranbrook Hill Road up the hill to Kueng Rd., on the left (south). Turn here and follow to the end of the road where the parking lot is located.
The lake is a short, 10-15 minute walk from the parking lot. Canoes and small boats can be packed into the lake, or you can choose to fish right off the dock. To access the new dock, follow the trail along the northern shore of the lake and then turn left (south) onto another trail that follows the western shore of the lake.

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Smallmouth Bass confirmed on Booth Lake

Submitted by: souts

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 12:33pm

Submitted in: Booth Lake
Species: Smallmouth Bass

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Confirmed Smallmouth Bass in Booth Lake

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Northern Pike confirmed on Booth Lake

Submitted by: souts

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 12:33pm

Submitted in: Booth Lake
Species: Northern Pike

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Confirmed Northern Pike in Booth Lake

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Smallmouth Bass confirmed on Canoe Lake

Submitted by: souts

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 12:29pm

Submitted in: Canoe Lake
Species: Smallmouth Bass

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Confirmed Smallmouth Bass in Canoe Lake

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Lake Trout confirmed on Daisy Lake

Submitted by: souts

Submitted on: Monday the 27th of June 2016 at 12:28pm

Submitted in: Daisy Lake
Species: Lake Trout

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Confirmed Lake Trout in Daisy Lake

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